OS X Archives - Page 5 of 19 - MikeSel - Downloads, How-To's, News, Reviews & Rumours


MacKeeper v2.61

As a daily OS X user, I know just how important it is to keep your Mac running as good as new. There’s nothing worse than having to sit and wait for your Mac whilst it processes the most basic of commands and requests.

OS X is a complex beast, and if you don’t do regular maintenance you’ll soon find it grinding to a halt. Sure, there’s hundreds of terminal commands and finder tweaks you can do to clean things up. But with applications such as MacKeeper available to download there’s really no need to fumble around in the terminal.

Launching MacKeeper automatically starts the ‘Fast Cleanup’ scan, which even on my packed 500GB ‘spiny disk’ hard drive takes about 3 minutes to complete. Once done the fresh, easy to use GUI outlines everything MacKeeper is able to clean using it’s “one click” clean process. During the fast cleanup, MacKeeper cleans unused application binaries, empties system and user cache locations, removes unused language files from applications and clears down log file locations.

So what does this mean

By default, when you install applications they also install the required language files to service every possible language. (Which have been packaged with the app) So for example if your Mac OS X is installed with only the UK language packs, chances are you are not going to need the bulk of German, French, Spanish etc language files in each of your installed apps. As you can imagine, these can quite rapidly start taking up storage space.

Equally the cache locations can also become packed out with cache files for each of your used applications. Sure, cache’s are great for speeding up the launch of often used apps. However, no doubt your frequent app use changes every now an then. So it’s always a good idea to regenerate the cache now and again.

Also – log file rotation is often set quite low with some applications, so some log files can be kept for weeks, months or even years. Generally when investigating an issue you would only need a hand full of log files, and would rarely need to go hunting through older logs.

I generally run clean up operations (after a full system backup of course) on a monthly basis and generally clear down between 500mb to 1GB’s worth of accumulated ‘junk’. So imagine if you’ve never performed a cleanup on your two-year old mac!

But wait! There’s more..

Where MacKeeper stands out from the crowds of other system maintenance tools is with its plethora of other built-in utilities and tools. Such as; Duplicates file finder, Disk Usage mapper, Smart Uninstaller, update tracker, data encryptor, file shredder, deleted file recovery, Internet security and theft recovery to name but a few!

That’s a total of apps worth £410.00, that you get bundled with MacKeeper for only £34.95!

The Good:

MacKeeper makes it extremely easy for even the mac novice keep their mac running as good as new, and utilise as much space as possible on the stock hard drive. The utilities are easy to use, and give excellent feedback and detailed instructions of what’s going to happen when you push the buttons etc. Whats more, each tab of the application has the ability to connect you to the MacKeeper support team.

The Bad:

MacKeeper performs tasks that could be done using terminal (if you are brave enough, and have to time to research and practice the commands) although that could be dangerous if you are not a confident terminal user..

The Bottom Line:

This app get’s 5 out of 5 for its ease of use and all round collection of system utilities. With this installed there’s nothing more you will need to keep your mac in ‘tip-top’ condition.


One feature which seems to divide the masses is OS X’s ability to relaunch your applications on startup/reboot. This feature is know as Apple Persistence, which is personally a feature I am not really a fan of. It’s very rare for me to want the same applications on each use of my MacBook, asides from the obvious email and unified comms clients of course.

So – to disable to ‘persistent’ application mode simply follow these simple steps below

  1. Open the Utilities folder
  2. Open a terminal window
  3. Copy and paste the following line in:
    sudo defaults write -g ApplePersistence -bool no
  4. Enter your password and press enter

Now the next time you reboot, you’ll be greeted with your beautiful desktop wallpaper, and not the plethora of apps and browser windows.

If you decide you miss the feature, all you need to do is switch the boolean value back to yes:

sudo defaults write -g ApplePersistence -bool yes

ChromeGoogle Chrome for OS X generally doesn’t play well with proxy servers, especially those that require NTLM authentication. Those who have tried to use it in the past will be greeted with a constant barrage of proxy authentication prompts, each successful entry of credentials loads a tiny little bit more of the site..

However, there is a way to resolve this. Using a simple command in OS X terminal you can enable NTLM authentication in Chrome, and only have to enter your credentials once.

  1. Open Finder
  2. Open the Utilities folder
  3. Open a terminal window
  4. Copy and paste the following line in:
    Sudo /Applications/Google Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google Chrome --auth-schemes="ntlm"
  5. Enter your password and press enter
  6. Now quit and relaunch all Chrome windows.

That’s it. You should never be prompted again, at least not until you change your password.

Mike Hudson WhoIs ScreenshotDid you know that you can obtain domain whois information for any web domain using
nothing but OS X Terminal?

For years I’ve used many web services including (and probably my favourite) CentralOps, however, sometimes its handy to be able to do things without leaving the comfort of your current terminal session!

So.. To get some of the information web services can provide, launch Terminal and type:

whois google.co.uk

NOTE: You can replace google.co.uk with the domain name of your choice.

WHOIS (pronounced as the phrase who is) is a query and response protocol that is widely used for querying databases that store the registered users or assignees of an Internet resource, such as a domain name, an IP address block, or an autonomous system, but is also used for a wider range of other information. The protocol stores and delivers database content in a human-readable format. The WHOIS protocol is documented in RFC 3912.



One of the powerful features of OS X built-in spotlight is its ability to search the contents of files for your search string.. However, for reasons yet unknown, I have found this functionality to sometimes be a little hit and miss..

Which is where Terminal comes in.. Using a single line terminal command OS X will rapidly return all the files containing the text you are looking for.

First of all, for this example you need to first set your current path in terminal to the folder containing the files you want to query.

Then type/copy & paste the following

So for example, should you want to find all the text files containing the word AppleScript, you would use the following command:

To expand of the example above, should you want to extend that and search sub folders all you need to do is add ‘r’ for recursive:

This will now return all text files in the folder and subfolder containing the term AppleScript.

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