ChromeGoogle Chrome for OS X generally doesn’t play well with proxy servers, especially those that require NTLM authentication. Those who have tried to use it in the past will be greeted with a constant barrage of proxy authentication prompts, each successful entry of credentials loads a tiny little bit more of the site..

However, there is a way to resolve this. Using a simple command in OS X terminal you can enable NTLM authentication in Chrome, and only have to enter your credentials once.

  1. Open Finder
  2. Open the Utilities folder
  3. Open a terminal window
  4. Copy and paste the following line in:
    Sudo /Applications/Google Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google Chrome --auth-schemes="ntlm"
  5. Enter your password and press enter
  6. Now quit and relaunch all Chrome windows.

That’s it. You should never be prompted again, at least not until you change your password.



Mike Hudson WhoIs ScreenshotDid you know that you can obtain domain whois information for any web domain using
nothing but OS X Terminal?

For years I’ve used many web services including (and probably my favourite) CentralOps, however, sometimes its handy to be able to do things without leaving the comfort of your current terminal session!

So.. To get some of the information web services can provide, launch Terminal and type:

whois google.co.uk

NOTE: You can replace google.co.uk with the domain name of your choice.

WHOIS (pronounced as the phrase who is) is a query and response protocol that is widely used for querying databases that store the registered users or assignees of an Internet resource, such as a domain name, an IP address block, or an autonomous system, but is also used for a wider range of other information. The protocol stores and delivers database content in a human-readable format. The WHOIS protocol is documented in RFC 3912.

Source



20130330-212630.jpg

One of the powerful features of OS X built-in spotlight is its ability to search the contents of files for your search string.. However, for reasons yet unknown, I have found this functionality to sometimes be a little hit and miss..

Which is where Terminal comes in.. Using a single line terminal command OS X will rapidly return all the files containing the text you are looking for.

First of all, for this example you need to first set your current path in terminal to the folder containing the files you want to query.

Then type/copy & paste the following

grep -l "Search String" File.Extentions

So for example, should you want to find all the text files containing the word AppleScript, you would use the following command:

grep -l AppleScript *.txt

To expand of the example above, should you want to extend that and search sub folders all you need to do is add ‘r’ for recursive:

grep -lr AppleScript *.txt

This will now return all text files in the folder and subfolder containing the term AppleScript.



20121102-220141.jpg
One of the most used features on my OS X installs is the Quick Look feature, its much easier then launching an app just to check, or to quickly read off its content. However, for as long as I can remember Quick Look has always been known for causing delays in folder navigation, high CPU and high network utilisation. This is generally down to it rendering previews of movie files in the active finder window. Yes – this even includes items on your desktop.

There are a couple of ways to combat this speed delay without loosing functionality of Quick Look on other files.

The easiest is to remove the Quick Look generator from the quick look folder. To do this, click on Go > Go To Folder now type or copy paste /System/Library/QuickLook/ now either delete or if you’d prefer move Movie.qlgenerator to another location.

This will disable the thumbnails for movie files, and speed up finder navigation – especially for media heavy folders.



For months now I’ve used MobileRSS to satisfy my need for RSS feed reading.. Well, I used it to pull in the contents of my Google Reader account anyway. However, of late its been suffering with a very annoying issue in that it would automatically start googling for code errors in the pages you were reading, making it almost impossible to use. So I decided it was time for a fresh start, I hit the AppStore and almost immediately stumbled upon Feedly.

Unlike MobileRSS Feedly serves its RSS content in a kind of newspapermagazine layout. Making it far more appealing to the eye. Not only that but it pulls in all of the photo’s from the articles too. This makes skimming the news much easier to do when your pushed for time.

Feedly is available from the AppStore for both iPhone and iPad, and packs in some pretty cool features.

20121021-083947.jpgFeedly is a fine example of how HTML5 can be used to create a clean and minimalistic interface. Feedly works best (in my opinion) if you’ve already got a Google Reader account. However it does have some built in news feeds to wet your appetite.

Feedly also features the expected sharing abilities, allowing for quick and easy posting to Facebook and Twitter. It’s also got its own web client built in to make reading the RSS feeds full post a breeze.

All in all I really love Feedly and its features, and I’m yet to find anything which comes close to it. What are you waiting for? Get it downloaded!




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